About Our Stones

Agate

A derivative of quartz, primarily the chalcedony variety, agate is popular for its striations and color varieties. Thought to be a stone that strengthens the body and mind, agate has traditionally been seen as a stone of "strength and courage."  We find the deep rich neutrals perfect for our earthtone lines.

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Amethyst

The most striking stone of the quartz family, Amethyst has long been thought of as the "stone of royalty." Moses described it as a symbol of the Spirit of God in the official robes of the High Priest of the Jews. Ranging in intensity from soft purple to deep violet, this stone brings those born in the month of February a truly wonderful birthstone.

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Apatite

Apatite is rarely used as a gemstone.  It is said to contain significant amounts of "rare earth elements" on the periodic table and the Apollo astronauts brought back moon rocks containing trace amounts of apatite.  We find the green and blue derivations of apatite to be quite beautiful and luminous and incorporate them into designs whenever possible.

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Aquamarine

Aquamarine is a form of beryl, much like its green cousin, the emerald.  It is iron that gives the beautiful aquamarine its ethereal cyan hue of blue.  Often found in granite, Aquamarine is the lucky stone of the mariner as legend tells of its origin in the treasure chests of mermaids. This March birthstone is the stone of lovers and promises to bring emotional wealth to a marriage.

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Black Onyx

Onyx, a form of chalcedony, which is a variety of quartz, comes in an array of colors.  The pure black version, is more uncommon than its sisterly counterparts.  Referred to in the bible as the foundation of the City of Heaven, onyx has long been thought of as a grounding, firm, stone of depth and courage.

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Blue Chalcedony

Chalcedony is quite simpy, "microcrystalline quartz," which means it is composed of tiny microscopic crystals invisible to the naked eye.  It comes in many varieties and each is called by its unique name, such as agate, jasper, onyx or carnelian.  It is commonly referred to as Chalcedony when ranging from white to grayish blue, and sometimes green.

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Blue Pearl

Found naturally or cultured, freshwater or seawater, pearls have long been sought out for their beauty, luster and mystical attraction.  They are considered an "organic gemstone" in that they come from one of our animals rather than the earth.  The blue pearl variety comes from the black lipped pearl oyster and used to be thought of as cast-offs, but have gained great popularity over the last few decades.

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Blue Topaz

Originally colorless, pure topaz is thought to be from a legendary island in the Red Sea called Topazos.  Ancient history records this stone as traditionally yellow, but modern gemologists and jewelers consider topaz to come in a variety of colors.  Heat determines the nature of the blue topaz and its various hues including swiss blue, sky blue and london blue.

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Brown Pearl

Found naturally or cultured, freshwater or seawater, pearls have long been sought out for their beauty, luster and mystical attraction.  They are considered an "organic gemstone" in that they come from one of our animals rather than the earth.  Brown pearls, or Chocolate pearls are very rarely found naturally and most are treated to achieve the rich neutral brown color and nacre.

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Carnelian

Carnelian is simply a form of chalcedony colored by iron oxide... what we commonly know as rust.  From pale orange to deep dark reddish brown, this stone is rich with history.  Used in Roman times for signet rings and wax sealing as well as inlay for the Taj Mahal, this stone has long been sought out for its lustrous and rich orange hues.

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Chrysophrase

Chrysophrase is the most sought after form of Chalcedony.  Considered the most valuable of the chalcedony family, it gets its lovely apple green color from slight trace amounts of nickel found in the compound.  It can vary from light to dark and it porous and translucent.  Legend praises it hightly for its ability to bring joy and laughter.

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Citrine

Citrine is the yellow version of quartz.  It is actually treated amethyst or smoky topaz and its name is derived from its color...that of a lemon, or "citron."  It is often found in the same crystal as amethyst in which case it is referred to as ametrine.  Citrine is one of the traditional birthstones of November.

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Garnet

Garnet has been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives.  It comes in a wide array of reds from the almandine colors to the prized rhodolite varieties.  Rarer are the green versions, but still quite prized nonetheless.  Garnet is a favorite gemstone, especially among its January birth month fans.

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Green Onyx

Onyx, a form of chalcedony, which is a variety of quartz, comes in a variety of colors.  The green version of onyx is known in traditional spiritualism is a stone to aleviate worry and produce calm.  It has been used over the centuries in rosaries as a symbol for strength and stamina.

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Green Pearl

Found naturally or cultured, freshwater or seawater, pearls have long been sought out for their beauty, luster and mystical attraction.  They are considered an "organic gemstone" in that they come from one of our animals rather than the earth.  Green pearls are usually treated and are most commonly of the freshwater mollusk.  The occasional naturally colored green pearl is a South Sea Tahitian Pearl in a "Peacock" color.

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Kyanite

Kyanite, a banded metamorphic mineral, comes in various shades of blue to green.  It is not uncommon as a gemstone, but more often used in idustrial uses.  The gemstone variety when polished and set ranges from beautifully striated to a highly clear deep blue similar to a light sapphire.

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Lapis

Lapis is actually a rock, composed of various minerals, one of which is primarily lazurite, giving it is rich intense blue.  Calcite (white), Sodalite (blue) and Pyrite (metallic yellow) are also often found in Lapis.  Prized for its intensity, Lapis can be traced back to early Egyptian Pre-dynastic sites and was widely used to proclaim royalty and wealth.

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Mother Of Pearl

Mother of Pearl, appropriately named, is the irridescent substance that is found on the inside of any nacreous mollusk able to produce a pearl.  Depending on the species, it can come in a large array of colors, and due to the layered nature of how it forms, it can be very strong and resilient.

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Peridot

Peridot is the mineral "olivine," but when found gem quality, it is called peridot.  It is one of the few gemstones that is found only in one color ranging from a light pale yellow green to a deep luminescent olive, which is the most valuable and rare. It is the birthstone for the month of August.

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Pink Pearl

Found naturally or cultured, freshwater or seawater, pearls have long been sought out for their beauty, luster and mystical attraction.  They are considered an "organic gemstone" in that they come from one of our animals rather than the earth.  Pink Pearls today are most often treated, but naturally colored pink pearls, found from the Carribean "Queen Conch," are quite beautiful and very rare.

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Pyrite

Pyrite, often confused with Marcasite, is a mineral commonly known as "Fool's Gold."  It is a favorite among collectors and has a beautiful luster and interesting crystals.  It has a high concentration of iron, although not used as a significant iron source.  A fascinating and beautiful mineral, pyrite can be found often in the rock formation of Lapis.

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Quartz

Quartz, one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust, comes in many varieties. Pure quartz, traditionally called rock crystal (or clear quartz) is colorless and transparent.  It's transparency is relative to its quality and makeup.  It is the chemical foundation of many semi-precious gemstones.

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Rainbow Moonstone

Rainbow Moonstone is from the feldspar family of minerals.  It is white and clear and often has a pearl-like appearance. In fact, it is interchangeable with pearl as the June birthstone.  It has the wonderful property of adularescence which give it is beautiful shimmery glow in the light.

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Rutilated Quartz

Rutilated quartz is quite simply, quartz, with rutile inside.  These "rutiles" resemble gold threads embedded inside the stone, but are actually titanium ore.  Rutilation can actually appear in various colors from black to red, but more commonly in the much sought after gold color.  It is quite striking and unusual.

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Sapphire

Sapphire, traditionally a precious gem in the blue colorway, also comes in a "fancy sapphire" variety.  This variation of sapphire, mostly mined in Africa and often called "Africa's rainbow gemstone," comes in ranges of pink, green, orange and yellow.  It can also be clear.  We love this rainbow array for its rich colors and vibrancy.

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Shell

Shells have long been prized for collecting, tools, jewelry, even flatware.  There are numerous species and varieties, but we primarily focus on the wearable art shells like the cowrie, the conch and varieties of the nautilus.  Mother of pearl is part of a shell as well, but is considered a separate material altogether because of its nacre.  They have a wonderful attraction and mystery largely in part to their history and organic aura.

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Smoky Topaz

Smoky Topaz, a misnomer, is actually the brown version of Quartz, much like Citrine and Amethyst.  It has a wonderfully deep brown hue and often quite beautiful depth and fire.  Originally found in Scotland, it has become the official gem of the country.  Legend has told that it has mystical properies and Queen Elizabeth I is said to have employed seers with Smoky Topaz to tell the future of England.

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Sunstone

"The Leadership Stone," Sunstone is often thought to promote optimism and good will.  It is primarily orange and red with sparkling spots on its surface creating an optical effect called "aventurescence."  It enhances vitality, promotes independence and encourages originality. 

 

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Tiger Eye

Tiger Eye, an luminescent brown stone can attribute its silky luster to a phenomenon called chatoyancy.   This optical reflectance occurs from fibrous inclusions or cavities within the stone.  Long thought of as a stone of courage and protection, it is fitting that Roman soldiers wore this stone into battle.

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Tourmaline

Tourmaline is most commonly pink or green, or when found together, "watermelon," the most uncommon and sought after.  It also comes yellow, blue and black, and every hue in between.  Egyptian mythology tells the story of tourmaline growing up out of the earth, passing through a rainbow, resulting in tourmaline's many beautiful colors. October often adopts it as its birthstone instead of opal.

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Turquoise

Turquoise, as a gem, is very rare in finer grades.  However, it has been devalued over the years due to the many synthetics and artificial substitues on the market.  We only use true turquoise and pride ourselves on the color and quality we choose for our jewelry.  It is a very special stone and often used as the birthstone for December.

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White Pearl

Found naturally or cultured, freshwater or seawater, pearls have long been sought out for their beauty, luster and mystical attraction.  They are considered an "organic gemstone" in that they come from one of our animals rather than the earth.  White pearls, the most common are often graded and come in slightly varying colors with hues of yellows, pinks, even lavenders.  If you are lucky enough to be born in June, it is your birthstone.

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